Laura Brown Rodgers – Bringing Light

The work of the Samango Monkey Research Project, midlands KZN would not be possible if it were not for the generous contribution of philanthropist Laura Brown Rodgers of the Laura Brown Rodgers Community Fund of New Jersey in the USA. Laura is one of those beautiful people who shines light and brings hope to what … Continue reading Laura Brown Rodgers – Bringing Light

Samango Monkey Research Project – Update, August 2018

  Dispersing Samango Males - Karkloof and Dargle 23rd July, 2018 Silence saturated the air after Lizzie and I left Mbona Private Nature Reserve’s (http://mbona.co.za/) tranquil, indigenous forest where we’d spent a few hours deep in the forest watching samango monkeys. Turning off Karkloof Road, onto a hazy road, in the direction of Karkloof Canopy … Continue reading Samango Monkey Research Project – Update, August 2018

Do antelopes mimic monkeys?

Observing Bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) in the company of baboons and monkeys is a relatively common sight in South Africa. It's thought they have a symbiotic relationship, one that assists both species to outwit a lurking predator or make food more accessible. But how much do we know about their interactions?

Declining primate populations – where samangos and humans meet

Sixty percent of primate species are heading towards extinction According to the most recent scientific assessment, human influence has caused 60% of wild primate species to head towards extinction with three quarters declining steadily.

Friends in high places: The vervet (Chlorocebus pygerythrus)/samango (Cercopithecus albogularis labiatus) relationship

While following up on the fascinating relationship between two species at one of our study sites - a matrix habitat where humans and nonhuman primates co-exist - we came across the vervets and samangos eating small yellowish, hairless, figs plucked off the branches of an evergreen Forest fig.

Life as a bachelor male (Cercopithecus albogularis labiatus)

Two days ago while driving along the main road in Dargle Valley, an adult male samango monkey ran across the road in front of my vehicle then disappeared into a Bluegum plantation. It is believed that samango troops do not wander far away from the forest patches they live in, but this is not the case for the bachelor males who leave their natal troops around the age of six years.